In Summary
  • According to the report, South Sudan gets 97 per cent of its budgeted revenue from forward petroleum sales.
  • Numerous reports by UN teams, human rights organisation and just displaced South Sudanese apportion lots of blame to the Kiir’s internationally recognized government.

It seems when it comes to perverted priorities the Government of the Republic of South Sudan scores high.

On Friday, AFP, the French news agency, cited a United Nations confidential report saying “Weapons continue to flow into South Sudan from diverse sources, often in coordination with neighbouring countries”.

The agency went on, saying UN experts found a “preponderance of evidence” showing “continued procurement of weapons by the leadership in Juba” for the army, the security services, militias, and “associated forces”.

According to the report, South Sudan gets 97 per cent of its budgeted revenue from forward petroleum sales.

Translated, that means whatever the price at any time. Cash on delivery would make sense.

That aside, the UN 48-page report says that from late March to October last year, oil revenue totalled $243 million (Ksh24.5bn), and crude oil business hasn’t been the most lucrative business in the last few years. Anyway, where did South Sudan’s money go?

Well, according to the report, the government continued to sign arms deals. Authorities in Juba, a town on the banks of River Nile that’s South Sudan’s capital, will argue it has a rebellion. Actually what it has is a power struggle.

The protagonists are President Salva Kiir and his former vice president Riek Machar. It’s on record the latter has a long history of destabilising situations that never suited him.

On their ego trip, the two have fallen into the trap of turning the country into a tribal — majority Dinka and the number two Nuer — slaughter field.

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