In Summary
  • The cost of 70 kilogrammes of dairy meal retails between Sh2,200 and Sh3,000 up from less than Sh1500, depending on the protein content of the feeds.
  • Most dairy farmers in the country practice free range dairy farming, relying on rains for pasture.
  • The recent drought affected milk production cutting yields by nearly half.

Milk producers want livestock manufacturers to reduce prices of animal feeds following government’s duty waiver on yellow maize imports.

The dairy farmers say the feeds prices should be reviewed as it contributes to about 60 per cent of cost of production at the farm level.

“We are happy with the decision by President [Uhuru Kenyatta] to waive the duty because it will lower costs.

"However, we are yet to feel the impact of this,” said Mr Richard Tuwei, the Kenya Dairy Farmers Federation chairperson.

The cost of 70 kilogrammes of dairy meal retails between Sh2,200 and Sh3,000 up from less than Sh1500, depending on the protein content of the feeds.

Last Monday, while addressing farmers during the commissioning of a Sh400-million modern UHT production unit at the New KCC factory in Eldoret Town, President Kenyatta said that the move was meant to encourage the country’s dairy productivity and lower cost of production.

“As a country we don’t have enough yellow maize which is usually used to make animal feeds. I have directed that all yellow maize shall be imported duty-free to lower the cost of production and enable our farmers to increase milk production,” Mr Kenyatta said.

Zero-rate dairy products

President Kenyatta also announced that the government will zero-rate all milk and dairy products to make it affordable to consumers as government intervention to increase consumption.

Most dairy farmers in the country practice free range dairy farming, relying on rains for pasture.

The recent drought affected milk production, cutting yields by nearly half. Farmers say by reducing costs, farmers will significantly be able to access quality animals feeds.

“Most farmers and their animals are recovering from the drought and most of them had resorted to other waste products such as rice germ due to shortage of maize,” said Mr Tuwei.

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