In Summary
  • Bukura college starts to produce its own milk products after years of focusing on training only.
  • The college has set up a milk processing plant to make yoghurt, mala and pasteurised milk as it seeks to turn around its fortunes and train all-round agri-entrepreneurs.
  • The products go for between Sh30 and Sh70. David Wafula, the processing supervisor, says the institution produces three different blends of yoghurt namely strawberry, vanilla and coconut.
  • Dr Robert Egessa, a lecturer at Masinde Muliro University, says the processing plant will improve the region’s economy calling on farmers to practice dairy farming in large-scale because of the ready market.

Sometime back, Bukura Agricultural College in Kakamega County was described as a sleeping giant.

The oldest agricultural training institution in the country, set up in 1924, according to critics was doing little besides the training of agriculturalists – its core function.

The institution, it is apparent, did not take the criticism lightly and is waking up from ‘slumber’.

The college has set up a milk processing plant to make yoghurt, mala and pasteurised milk as it seeks to turn around its fortunes and train all-round agri-entrepreneurs.

“The processing plant is the first step in commercialising our agricultural activities since our establishment. We make several products but yoghurt is our priority,” says Dr Richard Wekesa, the principal.

The plant was started in July last year with funding from the German government, which donated processing equipment worth Sh34 million.

“We are currently processing 600 litres of milk into various products daily that include yoghurt and mala from our 34 out of the 80 dairy cows we have,” says Wekesa, noting the animals are mainly of the Jersey, Friesian and Guernsey breeds.

The institution sells the products packaged in 100, 250 and 500ml packs and branded Bukura College in Kakamega, Vihiga, Siaya, Bungoma and Busia counties.

The products go for between Sh30 and Sh70. David Wafula, the processing supervisor, says the institution produces three different blends of yoghurt namely strawberry, vanilla and coconut.

“We also buy milk from farmers at Sh40 a litre. Once we get it, the milk is weighed and thereafter checked for quality before we process it,” he says.

BOOST DAIRY PRODUCTION

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