In Summary
  • My engagement with readers through this magazine over the last 24 months has taught me one thing, which is that they like stories about every day experiences on the farm.
  • However, sometimes I lack ideas. What I do in such instances is simply to take a walk around my desk, go for a jog, or sleep over it and, guess what, when I get back the next time, some new ideas pop in my head. 
  • As a fan of this column, expect more informative and interesting pieces going forward because of the several things I am doing on the farm.

Around this time last year, I gave readers a glimpse of what it was writing the diary.  

Today, as the diary turns two, I wish to share my reflections and plans and pay tribute to hundreds of fans who’ve kept in touch – through their feedback. 

I’ll start with a common question I get from readers. “What happens when you just can’t think of a topic to write about?” one asked me.  

Another related question was, “Do you struggle sometimes to come up with your story ideas?” 

My engagement with readers through this magazine over the last 24 months has taught me one thing, which is that they like stories about every day experiences on the farm.

In fact, some story ideas that appear trivial sometimes resonate better with readers.  

For instance, the story of my arrest by the police for using my private diesel-powered ramshackle vehicle to carry goods resonated well with many (Seeds of Gold, Jan 21).  

In fact, the story took a life of its own. The policeman called me after it was published to congratulate me. Another reader who was having problems with his diesel engine asked me for the contacts of Wanyoike, the mechanic who had repaired my vehicle.  

However, sometimes I lack ideas. What I do in such instances is simply to take a walk around my desk, go for a jog, or sleep over it and, guess what, when I get back the next time, some new ideas pop in my head. 

In fact, great writers like Dr Travis Bradberry agree that ideas take time to develop and you don’t have to force them. “You can edit a bad story, but you can’t edit a blank page,” he says.  

As I’ve said before, when events start unfolding, I always assume I have a story even if I can only write two sentences.  

Another thing that I normally do to overcome writers’ mental block is to have two or three back up stories just in case what I’m working on isn’t flowing.  

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