In Summary
  • The lake is situated inside one of the premium parks in the country, which is home to up to 50 mammal species.
  • The National Disaster Operation Centre desk officer promised that the operation would not stop until it yields results.

The high levels of pollution in Lake Nakuru have been the greatest challenge in the search of remains of three victims of a campaign helicopter crash on October 21.

For the last 17 days that the search has been going on, the recovery team has had to endure hours in extremely dirty water and silt, which has frustrated their efforts to locate and retrieve the bodies.

The high levels of raw sewage mixed with water has not made things any lighter for divers manoeuvring the otherwise shallow lake.

WASTE MANAGEMENT
Even the fuselage of the ill-fated chopper is yet to be traced in the lake, more than two weeks after the crash.

So far, only two bodies and a few fragments of the chopper have been retrieved. The two have since been buried.

The high pollution has put the county government of Nakuru on the spot on waste management.

FAMILIES
The lake is situated inside one of the premium parks in the country, which is home to up to 50 mammal species and more than 450 birds species both in water and dry land.

According to one of the divers, the water is also soapy, making it difficult to see through the water.

“When you rub your hands after getting into contact with the water you are able to produce foam,” he said.

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