In Summary
  • And who can blame you? The current lot of Lions doing service for the NTSA is pretty to look at — as I had indicated earlier — and one would be forgiven for lusting after them if one did not already know Peugeots and their reputation for fickleness.
  • Great cars to look at, great cars to drive, great cars for placing bets on unreliability.
  • Peugeot has had a line of GTI-branded cars that were pure manna for the discerning connoisseur helmsman; of particular note are the 106, 205 and 505 Turbo, and of course the 405 Mi16.

Dear Sir, 

You were spot on, man! I am, indeed, a farmer and not doing too badly.

I retired from the civil service under the “50 years rule”, and yes, I did leave city life for the farm. The wife abandoned the Prado along Mbagathi Way when it “refused” to go round a relatively slow bend downhill just past the Riara University pedestrian overpass.

And I find myself looking longingly at the Peugeots (most with GK plates) zooming around…Maybe, just maybe….

Patrick

 

Well, well, well! What have we here? I scored a perfect 10?

So you are a farmer (two points) and you are doing well (four). You left the city life for the farm (six) and you abandoned the Prado because of its less-than-stellar tarmac handling (eight) courtesy of the wife (10). I did not expect to be that accurate in my conjecture.

The one thing I did not see coming but should have is the Peugeot hang-up. You had already undergone this earlier, buying the 405 a while after the 504 left, with something else in between. I should have predicted you’d be back pining for another one.

And who can blame you? The current lot of Lions doing service for the NTSA is pretty to look at — as I had indicated earlier — and one would be forgiven for lusting after them if one did not already know Peugeots and their reputation for fickleness.

I am yet to drive one but I am really keen to. Perhaps their status of ill repute might be palliated by a fun and engaging drive experience. I don’t know, but looking at the past, there are signs of hope.

Peugeot has had a line of GTI-branded cars that were pure manna for the discerning connoisseur helmsman; of particular note are the 106, 205 and 505 Turbo, and of course the 405 Mi16. Great cars to look at, great cars to drive, great cars for placing bets on unreliability. It remains to be seen whether Urysia (the Peugeot sellers in Kenya) will play ball and hand over a set of keys or two, but let us see how this goes...

***** 

Hi,

I am an avid reader of your column. I would like you to review the Nissan Bluebird because I own a 2009 make and wherever I go, people say Nissans are not good cars. What’s your take, sir?

 

Well, word on the street is that the dashboard will melt if you park it in the sun. There seems to be some truth in this if you look around the interwebs.

Another word on the street is that rear legroom is more than excellent, and you don’t need the Internet for this, I will tell you right now: I have written here before that rear space in the Bluebird/Sylphy is very, very good. In fact, it is better than that in the new Mercedes-Benz E Klasse, and that is saying something. I have sat in both

***** 

JM,

I own an Audi A3 1.8 tfsi 2009 model. That thing “eats” engine oil like there is no tomorrow: one litre for about 1,000 kilometres.

Coupled with lack of spare parts and knowledgeable mechanics, it is making my hairline recede at an alarming rate! I can’t complain about the speed and looks, though.  I am thinking of trading it in for a Mitsubishi RVR 2010 model, a fitter version of Outlander really.

Do you think it’s a wise move?

What other trade-in options would you go for if you were in my shoes?

 

If I were in your shoes, I’d buy a Volkswagen Golf, specifically a GTI. The Golf is the closest thing to an A3 you can get on these shores. If anything, the A3 itself is one of the Golf’s many clones, alongside the Seat Leon and the Skoda Octavia. The proliferation of Rabbits in different guises and iterations means there is equally no shortage of experts who experiment with them. For such cars, if you walk on thin ice, you might as well tap dance. Ignore the whitewash poverty spec 1.4s and 1.6s and go for the cooking GTI. The R32 might be a little out of range for long-term use, but if you have the money, why not? YOLO.

***** 

Hi Baraza,

I want to buy a used Isuzu DMAX (20,000km mileage, KCL, 2016 model) vehicle. Please advise about its suitability for intensive field work for three months and normal use and intermittent field work thereafter.

It costs round Sh2.9 million

What about its resale value after a few years?

Peter

 

Sh2.9 million for a low mileage — effectively brand new — Isuzu DMAX sounds like a deal to me and you’d be unwise to walk away from it. The vehicle is rugged enough to withstand whatever you want to throw at it in those three months of intensity.

I don’t know what its resale value will be after a few years because much as I’m an amateur soothsaying gazer of crystal balls in my spare time, my talents cannot account for how you will treat the truck or who you will sell it to. Just use the car according to your needs and forget about resale value for the time being. “A few years” is a long way off; a lot of things could happen between now and then.

**** 

Dear Mr Baraza,

I am a ardent reader of your column since its inception and find it quite interesting.

I would be grateful for your help.

My problem is, I have a 1978 Mercedes Benz W123 series model with an electric sliding sunroof. The sliding roof is not working. Whenever I drive on an uneven tarmac road, there’s a noise that seems to come from the sliding roof.

Kindly let me know what the problem could be and where I can get it fixed. 

Kamaljeet Singh Matharu

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