“Anxiety and depression give rise to difficult and painful negative thoughts. Many patients have thoughts of mistakes, past failures or other negative thoughts. Metacognitive therapy addresses thinking processes,” Professor Hagen says, rather than the thought content.

Patients with depression “think too much, which MCT refers to as ‘depressive rumination’. Rather than ruminating so much on negative thoughts, MCT helps patients to reduce negative thought processes and get them under control,” he says.

By becoming aware of what happens when they start to ruminate, patients learn to take control of their own thoughts.

The paper is titled “Metacognitive therapy for depression in adults: A waiting list randomized controlled trial with six months follow-up”. It is in the Frontiers in Psychology journal.

 

 

 

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