In Summary
  • For my drink, I chose the Morning Joe from the five juices on offer. It was a delicious squeeze of red apples, lettuce and pineapple.
  • The sandwich was delicious too. I told Sarah so – and Sarah is the owner of the place.
  • She said she was glad I had enjoyed my lunch, and she asked me why I hadn’t been there before – because Stack and Squeeze is next door to my office.

There’s a very interesting sign in Stack and Squeeze. Above the display and in big letters you can’t miss, it says ‘BE HAPPY, BE YOURSELF – BE A SANDWICH, BECAUSE SANDWICHES ARE PERFECT’.

I’ve been thinking about that on and off since I went there  last Friday and Saturday. I mean, how can you both be yourself and also be a sandwich? Unless, you are a very gregarious person – because you are never alone in a sandwich!

Certainly, if you are one of the fillings in a Stack and Squeeze sandwich, you are never alone, because you will be stacked with a few other tasty items. Like the one I tried on the Friday lunchtime. It was the Tuna Turner where, between the two slices of fresh whole-wheat bread, the tuna was enjoying the company of chipotle mayo, tomato, cucumber and lettuce.

For my drink, I chose the Morning Joe from the five juices on offer. It was a delicious squeeze of red apples, lettuce and pineapple. The sandwich was delicious too. I told Sarah so – and Sarah is the owner of the place. She said she was glad I had enjoyed my lunch, and she asked me why I hadn’t been there before – because Stack and Squeeze is next door to my office.

I thought about that, too. I like sandwiches. They are perhaps not always the perfect answer for a lunch or a snack. But they were a very clever invention. You might know the story: how, in the 18th century and in England, John Montagu, the 4th Earl of Sandwich, ordered his butler to bring him meat placed between two pieces of bread.

It seems he liked eating his meat this way because it meant he could continue playing cards while eating, without using a fork, and without getting his cards greasy from eating meat with his bare hands. The idea caught on, and others began to order ‘the same as Sandwich’.

But the Lord’s biographer had a more respectful version of the story: that Lord Sandwich was a very busy man, with commitments to the Royal Navy and politics, and so he often ate at his desk.

I, too, like sandwiches. Being English, my idea of a sandwich was of a rather simple thing: usually of cheese slices between two rounds of buttered white bread. Sometimes the cheese was enlivened with tomato or moistened with cucumber. I suppose the most English of English sandwiches are the very thin cheese and cucumber ones served by the ladies supporting a cricket match in a southern village in summertime.

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