In Summary
  • Despite lack of support from our head teacher Bensouda, I took over the preparation for KCPE.
  • I created intimacy with the Standard Eight teachers to ensure that our candidates got the best.
  • We worked tirelessly day and night, in a bid to surpass last year’s mean score.

Following our school’s fairly respectable performance in 2016 KCPE when we had a respectable mean score of 197.4, there were high expectations that our 2017 candidates would do much better.

Enemies of development will start talking of how a mean score of 197.4 is low. These are people who have never stepped in a Statistics class.

I know they’ll say I have failed my several attempts at Statistics course at Kenyatta University, but at least I attended class and could not have left without picking a concept.

A mean of 197.4 may appear low, but once you remember we were the second best school in this region, then you will appreciate how good it was. If you consider that I remain the only teacher around who walks the talk of academic excellence, it will not be bad to call that performance as exemplary

Despite lack of support from our head teacher Bensouda, I took over the preparation for KCPE.

I created intimacy with the Standard Eight teachers to ensure that our candidates got the best.

We worked tirelessly day and night, in a bid to surpass last year’s mean score.

We had set a target of 265. In mid-July, on observing how the electioneering activities were greatly affecting school activities, I advised everyone that 265 marks would not be attainable and we revised it to 245. 

After the August 8 elections were done, I put in place great measures to recover the lost time.

From the response I saw from the pupils,  I even thought that perhaps 265 was still attainable – and told anyone who cared to listen that we may just still hit our earlier target. But Maraga and his network had other ideas, they annulled the presidential elections worsening the situation.

Once again I had no otherwise but to issue another warning, especially when you consider that there were so many things happening, and our school would be used as a an election centre.

I revised the target to 226.67, which was still much better that the previous years.

As you are aware, last week, using Nyayo, one of the best local architects in Mwisho wa Lami and beyond, I completed my house. And although Fiolina, resisted to move in the house, I have been spending most of the day there, cleaning the house and planting trees and flowers.

My plan is that when Fiolina eventually accepts to move in, she will find a home, not a house!

As such, I did not know much of what was happening outside, until last Tuesday when Nyayo came to see me. I thought he had come to see me as my architect.

“Where are the exam results?” he asked.

“Which exams?” I asked him. “KCPE will be out just before Christmas. Matiang’i releases the results early,”

“You are behind news Dre,” said Nyayo. “The exams are out already.”

“What do you mean? There is a problem. The marking was rushed and I am sure the results are fake.”

Shortly after, several parents came to see me. Given the state of economy of Mwisho wa Lami, not every parent had enough airtime to confirm marks. Kuya joined them at my place and we managed to check for a few students using his phone. None of them, including Index 1 had scored over 200 marks.

“I am not surprised,” I said. “This marking was rushed,” Kuya agreed with me. He taught maths in Class Eight and from the results we had checked, the best student in maths had 32 per cent!

I tried reaching Bensouda. After several attempts, she called back. I asked her if she had seen the results.

“You know the process, exams will be picked tomorrow, but those with money can check via SMS,” she said and disconnected her phone.

She had not reverted by Wednesday afternoon and parents were getting impatient.

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