In Summary

  • That pattern was evident. But precisely what is a “better” road? In what specific way do roads need to be improved to deliver the most life-changing benefits, and primarily for whom  –private motorists, commercial transporters, commuters, shoppers, businesses, bus passengers, boda-boda bikers, cyclists, pedestrians, donkey carts?

Rich or poor, north or south, all people need water, food, shelter, education, health services,  transport and communication systems, security and economic viability (personal and national).

The detail and the degree varies, but  these are the basic and universal drivers of voters’ wish lists…and hence candidates’ promises.  Always. If people lack any of these, they want it. 

If they have it, they want it to be good.  If it’s good, they want it to be better. All else is symptoms and sub-plots of how and by whom these essential qualities might be achieved.

What differs is which of these core issues is most urgent.

The computation of that is never simple.  Each individual life is itself a matrix of problems and preferences.   Multiply that by 50 million  (often conflicting) personal opinions and situations and you are unlikely to get a clear answer.  What you might get is a trend of sound bites that add up to a pattern.

One such pattern emerging from voter polls in recent weeks (amid many other and perhaps weightier issues) was the surprisingly high number of times voters led their responses with a wish for “better roads.” 

Nothing right or wrong about that. The availability, cost and quality of mobility is unquestionably life-crucial to all.  That pattern was evident. But precisely what is a “better” road? In what specific way do roads need to be improved to deliver the most life-changing benefits, and primarily for whom  –private motorists, commercial transporters, commuters, shoppers, businesses, bus passengers, boda-boda bikers, cyclists, pedestrians, donkey carts?

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