In Summary

  • “Yes, but you can call me Dre like everybody else does,” I stated. “And I am the one you have heard a lot about whose importance to the success of this election cannot be under-stated.”
  •  “I will go straight to the point,” she said. “We have a vacancy for a polling clerk as one did not turn up. We are thinking of you as a replacement.”
  • I was disappointed to hear that I was being considered for such a junior position. I held this position many years ago, when Moi was President.
  • “I wish to tell you that we have so many people who are interested in the position and if you do not want it, there are enough people to take it,” she said.

You will all remember how the IEBC, a few weeks ago, snubbed my application for the position of support elections trainer. Nor did they consider me for the position of presiding officer or even deputy presiding officer. And it had nothing to do with my qualifications. It was all politics and jealousy.

Mr Simba, who is contesting for MP and with whom I had some differences regarding his treatment of teachers, managed to convince the returning officer, who is his friend, and the IEBC team not to hire me. Secondly, given my great knowledge on electoral matters, most of the officers were worried that I would outshine them and that they would be asked by their bosses why I was not senior.

Upon hearing that I had not been considered, I was very upset and even considered to take legal action against IEBC. For without my involvement, the commission could not even claim to hold free and fair elections. However, upon further consultations, I decided to keep quiet.

“Do not force them to take you,” was the wise counsel from Fiolina, my wife. “Let things go wrong and that’s when they will regret not having employed you.” I agreed not to pursue the matter, even though that meant I would lose some cash.

That is why I was not surprised when I received a call from an IEBC official last week on Tuesday. They must have got into serious trouble and my help was urgently needed.

The IEBC had set up temporary offices at St Theresa’s Girls. And when I arrived I saw my peers, senior high school teachers, being taken through the presiding officer and deputy presiding officer training. I did not need a calculator to know that the IEBC was keen to have me join where I belong before they finished their training.

“Are you Mwalimu Andrew,” the lady asked me.

“Yes, but you can call me Dre like everybody else does,” I stated. “And I am the one you have heard a lot about whose importance to the success of this election cannot be under-stated.”

 “I will go straight to the point,” she said. “We have a vacancy for a polling clerk as one did not turn up. We are thinking of you as a replacement.”

I was disappointed to hear that I was being considered for such a junior position. I held this position many years ago, when Moi was President.

“I wish to tell you that we have so many people who are interested in the position and if you do not want it, there are enough people to take it,” she said.

“Give me a few minutes to consult,” I said.

I called my brother Pius, for wisdom on such matters.

“I wish they would give you a higher position,” he said.

“But wahenga walisema simba akikosa nyama hula nyasi,” he said, meaning that I should take up the role.

“Right now it’s not safe to hold a senior position in IEBC as we need you alive,” he said. I agreed with him.

“I am taking the job,” I told the lady, and as she handed over the forms to me, I added, “But only on one condition.”

She sat up, listening.

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