In Summary
  • The majority of those affected are from arid and semi-arid counties in northern Kenyan.
  • Besides families, millions of domestic and wild animals are also suffering the effects of delayed rains in the Coast and Rift Valley.
  • There will be a slight drop in the production of other food crops such as bananas, sorghum, cowpeas and green grams.

At least 3.5 million Kenyans are facing starvation due to the prolonged drought and erratic rains.

The figure is an increase from the 2.6 million projected by the government at the beginning of the year.

Agriculture Cabinet Secretary Willy Bett on Thursday said the majority of those affected are from arid and semi-arid counties in northern Kenyan.

This comes even as Mr Bett said the country expects an increase in the amount of maize that will be harvested by the end of this crop year, a situation he argues will help ease the food shortage currently bedevilling the country.

Besides families, millions of domestic and wild animals are also suffering the effects of delayed rains in the Coast and Rift Valley.

FOOD SITUATION

In a report on the current national food situation that was released on Thursday, Mr Bett says the ministry has projected a harvest of about 37.9 million bags of maize by the end of 2017, up from 36.9 million bags harvested in the same period last year.

The figure is, however, a drop of about 4.4 per cent of the 40 million bags the ministry had expected at the beginning of the year. 

“Of the counties facing starvation, Wajir, Turkana, Marsabit, Samburu, Tana River, Garissa, Mandera and Baringo, as well as parts of Kitui and Kajiado, have been listed as the worst hit,” said the CS.  The armyworm, which destroyed maize in the country’s food basket areas of Rift Valley, has also been blamed for the drop in production.

“The decline in overall production of maize was attributed to a reduction in the area under maize by 5.1 per cent, the late onset of rainfall, coupled with long dry spells mid-season and fall armyworm invasion,” Mr Bett told journalists at the ministry’s headquarters in Nairobi.

POOR RAINFALL

At the same time, production  of beans and Irish potato will decline by about 29 per cent and 17 per cent respectively due to inadequate certified seeds and poor rainfall.

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