In Summary
  • Turkana governor says the World Bank-funded project to be implemented under the Kenya Urban Support Programme is expected to be implemented in six years.

Forty five counties are unable to access Sh270 billion from the World Bank to develop their urban centres because the law bars them from getting funds directly from international lenders.

The Council of Governors has consequently approached the Senate to once again amend the County Allocation of Revenue Act, which was only assented to by President Kenyatta on Wednesday, to enable them to access the funds.

CASH-STRAPPED

President Kenyatta signed the bill into law, paving the way for the disbursement of Sh77 billion by the National Treasury to the cash-strapped counties to enable them to implement their development projects.

Governors had accused the State of sabotage, saying they had been compelled to seek loans from commercial banks to meet their needs, including paying workers’ salaries and buying drugs for their hospitals.

On Thursday, the Council of Governors chairman Josphat Nanok said: “The council would like to urge the Senate to quickly amend the Act to include the projected $22.3 million (Sh2.29 billion) for the next three years and $9 million (Sh927 million) for this financial year.”

He went on: “This will enable the county governments to proceed and budget for their respective allocations for the implementation of the urban programme.”

The Turkana governor, who spoke moments after chairing an extraordinary meeting that discussed a variety of issues, said the World Bank-funded project to be implemented under the Kenya Urban Support Programme is expected to be implemented in six years.

The bank envisages that if the law is successfully amended in January, counties will in February be expected to draw their supplementary budgets to include funds for the project as Treasury prepares for the release of the funds.

Should this happen, the funds should be in the counties’ bank accounts by March. 

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