In Summary
  • The media will also be free to cover the announcement of results in the 290 constituency tallying centres.
  • Mr Chebukati says some Returning Officers will be shuffled while others may face disciplinary action.

The electoral commission has pledged to be more transparent and accountable in its conduct of the October 26 repeat presidential election.

In a letter to opposition coalition National Super Alliance (Nasa), the commission says it will embed technical experts from the UN and the Commonwealth as well as representatives of candidates into the electoral ICT team.

The media will also be free to cover the announcement of results in the 290 constituency tallying centres.

BALLOT PAPERS
The letter by chairman Wafula Chebukati to Nasa executive director Norman Magaya dated September 22 was in response to the coalition’s "irreducible minimum" demands following the nullification of the August 8 presidential election by the Supreme Court on grounds that the Constitution and electoral laws were flouted.

In the communication, Mr Chebukati gives concessions on some of Nasa’s demands while pushing back on others.

For example, on the issue of printing of ballot papers and result forms, it says although it has a two-year contract with Al Ghurair, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) had also offered to procure the materials for it.

The request had been passed to the Treasury and is awaiting a response, Mr Chebukati says.

STAFF CHANGES
Already, Cabinet has approved Sh10 billion budget for the repeat election.

Nasa has demanded that the Al Ghurair printing contract be revoked.

On the demand for staff changes at the commission, Mr Chebukati says some Returning Officers will be shuffled while others may face disciplinary action arising from the nullified August 8 elections.

He is however silent on the senior officials at the headquarters who Nasa wants sacked.

MEDIA HOUSES
The commission says media houses should cover the announcements of the results in all the 290 Constituency Tallying Centres to promote accountability.

In the run-up to the August 8 General Election, the government warned media houses against releasing presidential election results before the commission, warning that those who defied the order risked losing their licences.

As a result, many of the returning officers refused to publicly display or share forms 34B — the constituency result documents— with journalists.

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