Five MPs have declared an onslaught on homosexuality, which includes rallying the public to arrest gay people where police fail to act.

Through a newly formed parliamentary caucus, the lawmakers will also be rallying their colleagues in Parliament to fully enforce relevant parts of the law that prohibits gay practice.

The caucus to fight gayism in Kenya was launched on Tuesday to coordinate all plans and activities meant to fight it.

It was announced in Parliament just a day after US President Barack Obama issued a statement urging Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni not to sign into law a Bill banning gayism in the neighbouring country.

The MPs want the National Security Committee of the National Assembly to summon the Attorney-General, the Director of Public Prosecutions and the Registrar General of Companies to explain how gay practice continues to thrive in the country despite being prohibited in the laws of the land.

Mr Irungu Kang’ata (Kiharu), Mr Julius Ndegwa (Lamu West) Mr John Njoroge (Kasarani), Mr Clement Wambugu (Mathioya) and Mr Stephen Kinyanjui (Kinangop) said they will lobby Kenyans to maintain harsh anti-gay laws and Parliament to tighten the current law.

Already, Mr Kang’ata has filed a question which is expected to spur a heated debate on the practice in the country when it comes before the floor of the House where it is expected to be referred to the relevant committee of Parliament for further action.

The caucus issued a hard-hitting statement declaring homosexuality wrong, illegal and unethical and demanding that any person promoting its practice be arrested.

The MPs said the AG and the DPP must explain why gays in the country still go around freely even publicly declaring their inclinations.

The Registrar General, on the other hand, will be required to explain how any gay group has been registered, if any.

Mr Njoroge argued that gayism was immoral and against the country’s cultural and religious traditions.

“Unless the law is amended, acts of gayism or promotion of such activities will remain illegal in the same manner stealing or killing is illegal. If need be, we are ready to strengthen the law to curb any breaches,” he stated.

The MPs said the law as it is, sufficiently bars homosexuality and should only be enforced. They stated that anyone who wishes to amend the law should channel the same through Parliament, but added that the same would be defeated by the people’s representatives.

Mr Kangata said some have mistaken woman to woman marriages in Kenya for gayism and that it was wrong.

“This is an arrangement for barren women to marry fellow women who sire children with men—not with women,” he stated.

The MPs also bashed President Obama for ‘intruding’ in African affairs arguing that it bordered on racism. Mr Ndegwa said in so far as Africans do not meddle into West affairs, they should not meddle in theirs. “It is not by coincidence that promoters of gayism have a tendency to be elitist with an affiliation with the West,” he said.

The caucus of MPs has rubbished arguments that gayism was a natural tendency that cannot be controlled, arguing that there was no gay gene to justify the argument.

“It is a human-made behavior, if it was a natural response, justification for our opposition to gayism would be shaky but now this is just a habit,” the group stated. Even if it was natural, the group said that would not be a bar for the law that disallows it.

The group rubbished arguments by the gay community that the practice was a victimless action of two consenting adults, arguing that if that was the case, then all laws dealing with victimless crimes such as suicide would have to go.

The MPs said the negative impact of gayism in the society if allowed to flourish will be profound and that it would open a floodgate for repeal other ‘victimless’ crimes.

Among its suggestions is that boarding schools be abolished and all schools be turned into day schools since that is where many are initiated into the practice.