In Summary
  • The feeling of watching frustrated parents whose daughters had not been accounted for scream in unfathomable grief with some disappearing into the empty classes weeping silently cannot be captured in a story.

  • I could not help but think it could have been me as a clueless Form One.

The last time I walked out of those green steel gates, I was a 17-year-old girl eager to discover what the world had in store for me. That was 10 years ago.

On Saturday afternoon, when I walked out of those green gates of Moi Girls School Nairobi, I was traumatised by what I had witnessed. Raw grief of heartbroken parents who had just received the worst news any parent should ever receive.

Their young daughters — barely into their first year of high school — had been consumed by a mysterious fire.

The feeling of watching frustrated parents whose daughters had not been accounted for scream in unfathomable grief with some disappearing into the empty classes weeping silently cannot be captured in a story.

Students in the company of their parents leave Moi Girls School, Nairobi, on September 2, 2017 as police keep watch. PHOTO | JEFF ANGOTE | NATION MEDIA GROUP

Students in the company of their parents leave Moi Girls School, Nairobi, on September 2, 2017 as police keep watch. PHOTO | JEFF ANGOTE | NATION MEDIA GROUP

As an old girl of the school, imagining what those helpless teenagers sleeping in that Kabarnet Dormitory — popularly known as ‘Kaba” — could have gone through was tear-jerking. Anyone who has passed through Moi Girls will tell you that Kabarnet was the dormitory exclusively for Form One students and a few prefects to chaperone them. The hostel was also the unofficial “headquarters” of the St John’s Ambulance First Aid crew.

GREAT WOMEN

It has for decades held the memories of so many great women who have passed through Moi Girls; the first day of high school and, for many, their first difficult days in a boarding school.

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