In Summary

  • Some legislators are worried they stand to lose their supporters to rivals who have started early campaigns, if they concentrate on their legislative and oversight roles in Parliament.
  • Lawmakers are keen to finalise matters scheduled for this final session, specially bills with constitutional timelines and finance-related Bills ahead of the next general election.

Parliamentary business has been disrupted by lack of a quorum, as most lawmakers are in their home counties wooing voters ahead of the next general election.

Some legislators are worried they stand to lose their supporters to rivals who have started early campaigns, if they concentrate on their legislative and oversight roles in Parliament.

Unlike before, when the quorum bell could be rang to alert lawmakers within the parliamentary precincts to come and participate in voting on bills in the chamber, nowadays, House sessions usually start late because of lack of a quorum.

The lawmakers say they have to balance between being in Parliament and serving their electorates.

“Representation is also part of our core mandate. But there are those who are perennial absentees in the House and those are the ones voters should be worried about,” Nyamira Senator Kennedy Mong’are said on Friday.

BUSY CUTTING DEALS

Mr Mong’are, a presidential aspirant, appealed to Kenyans to desist from electing leaders on the basis of their financial muscles or from families that have been in politics and focus on those who understand the needs of ordinary Kenyans.

“They don’t care about attending the parliamentary sessions because they are busy cutting deals elsewhere. It is unfortunate that voters end up re-electing such leaders at the expense of committed ones,” Mr Mong’are said.

But Senate Majority Leader Kithure Kindiki sought to downplay claims that the lawmakers have absconded their duties.

He said the lawmakers are keen to finalise matters scheduled for this final session, specially bills with constitutional timelines and finance-related Bills ahead of the next general election.

Page 1 of 2