In Summary
  • They also opposed a plan to have schools sharing the same compound run by a single board and one headteacher.

  • Knut Secretary-General Wilson Sossion also opposed the directive to dissolve boards of schools that share a compound.

  • He asked the TSC to reconsider the policy requiring headteachers to have degrees for primary schools and masters for secondary ones. 

Teachers have rejected a round of changes in the management of schools announced by their employer on Tuesday, saying some of them were punitive and unreasonable.

Their unions accused the Teachers Service Commission of failing to consult them on the staffing changes, which they said were far-reaching and would impact negatively on their lives.

They were particularly unhappy about a rule requiring that headteachers and their deputies be posted outside their home counties and that they must have master’s degrees to qualify for school management.

They also opposed a plan to have schools sharing the same compound run by a single board and one headteacher.

POLITICALLY-DRIVEN

Kenya Union of Post Primary Education Teachers (Kuppet) Secretary-General Akelo Misori described the policies as politically-driven.

“We are rushing some of these policies without carrying out adequate consultations,” said Mr Misori.

Kenya National Union of Teachers (Knut) Secretary-General Wilson Sossion also opposed the directive to dissolve boards of schools that share a compound.

He said the policy on identification, selection and deployment of administrators that will see headteachers and principals posted outside their home counties would break many families.

He accused the Ministry of Education of dictatorship and warned Cabinet Secretary Fred Matiang’i against implementing policies without full consultations.

“We must engage and agree. Merging of school boards will never happen unless outside Kenya and that is a resolution. Schools that are already registered with boards of management should be allowed to run whether two or four schools are in one compound,” Mr Sossion told more than 12,000 headteachers attending their annual conference in Mombasa.

DEGREES

He asked the TSC to reconsider the policy requiring headteachers to have degrees for primary schools and masters for secondary ones. 

“It is not right. By the time you are recruited to train as a teacher the minimum requirement has been set out, so the temptation to introduce these papers is against labour laws barring the terms and conditions of engagement,” he said. 

In Mombasa, Knut said the delocalisation policy introduced by TSC was uncalled for and requires more consultations with educationists.

Education expert Andiwo Obondo said while higher academic qualifications are important, TSC should train school heads on financial management. “We should not just look at academic papers but required skills to run these schools,” said Mr Obondo, adding that only teachers of high integrity should be recruited to manage schools.

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