In Summary
  • More than 30 families are believed to have been living in the building which was still under construction and tenants had moved into the ground, first and second floors.
  • Three years of study on Nairobi Buildings blamed structural integrity in cases where contractors stole cement and used less steel as well as the failure to verify quality of work for the ticking time bomb.
  • The Governor’s move to constitute a team to investigate the Makongeni incident also comes in the back of a proposed law that was crafted to address the same issue.

Nairobi Governor Evans Kidero has formed a seven man team to probe the safety of buildings in the County.

In a statement to media house, the Governor has constituted a team led by the Chairman of Architectural Association of Kenya to investigate, identify policy, legislation and operations gap which may have contributed to the collapse of a building last week.

The five-storey residential building collapsed on Wednesday near the Makongeni Police Station along Jogoo Road in Nairobi.

Four people died on the way to Kenyatta National Hospital, several others were injured and others were trapped in the debris.

Six people were treated and discharged while one remains in the hospital.

More than 30 families are believed to have been living in the building which was still under construction and tenants had moved into the ground, first and second floors.

Apparently Dr Kidero had denounced a study re-published by one of the Nation Media Group Publications, the Business Daily that had suggested that most buildings in the Eastlands area could not survive an earthquake.

The report initially published by a Science Journal done by Raul Figueroa of the Carnegie and Mellon foundation indicated that 3 out of 4 buildings would sustain serious damage in the event of an earthquake.

LESS AND CEMENT AND STEEL

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