In Summary
  • The government payroll stands at 172,522 employees but only 160,012 people turned up for the drive.
  • If it turns out that those who failed to register were ghost workers, then the government has been losing Sh600 million per month in paying salaries and allowances.
  • This also means that taxpayers have been losing up to Sh7.2 billion a year, a factor that has contributed to the ballooning wage bill.
  • The figure is higher than the Sh1.8 billion per year that President Uhuru Kenyatta said the government was losing when he launched an audit to weed out the ghost workers.

Over 12,500 names of government employees will be struck off the payroll beginning November after they failed to show up for the biometric registration.

The government payroll stands at 172,522 employees, but according to Devolution and Planning Cabinet Secretary Anne Waiguru, only 160,012 people turned up for the drive.

Consequently, if it turns out that those who failed to register were ghost workers, then the government has been losing Sh600 million per month in paying salaries and allowances.

This also means that taxpayers have been losing up to Sh7.2 billion a year, a factor that has contributed to the ballooning wage bill.

The figure is higher than the Sh1.8 billion per year that President Uhuru Kenyatta said the government was losing when he launched an audit to weed out the ghost workers at the beginning of the year.

While presenting preliminary findings of a report on the Capacity Assessment and Rationalisation of the Public Service (CARPS) programme carried out by the Inter-Governmental Steering Committee (IGSC), which she chairs, Ms Waiguru said workers who could not take part in the registration due to sickness or study leave were not included in the list of 12,510 missing persons.

STOP SALARIES

“In the wake of these developments, the steering committee has directed that both the national and county governments stop with immediate effect the salaries of the 12,510 who have failed to show up,” she said.

The report also revealed that about 300 officers were older than the official retirement age of 60.

Public Service Commission (PSC) Chairperson Margaret Kobia said the next step would be to establish who was responsible for the inclusion of the additional names so that proper legal action may be taken.

“We cannot ignore the possibility that some names may have been duplicated due to inter-departmental transfers and the devolution process.

“The complexity makes it necessary for the PSC to find out who should be held responsible,” she said.

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