In Summary
  • This may set the stage for a confrontation between Mr Odinga’s supporters and the police as Kenya’s post-election crisis drags on.

  • Mr Odinga Thursday told off the United States whose top Africa envoy this week told him to shelve the plans.

  • He has maintained he will only engage in dialogue about electoral justice with an ultimate goal of going back to the election.

Police will not allow any public gathering in Nairobi to swear in opposition leader Raila Odinga as the “People’s President” on Jamhuri Day.

Top security sources privy to the security plans for Jamhuri Day celebrations said police are under instructions not to allow gatherings in Nairobi except the official ceremony to be presided over by President Uhuru Kenyatta at Kasarani Stadium.

This may set the stage for a confrontation between Mr Odinga’s supporters and the police as Kenya’s post-election crisis drags on.

Mr Odinga Thursday told off the United States whose top Africa envoy this week told him to shelve the plans and instead seek dialogue with President Kenyatta.

Mr Donald Yamamoto urged the opposition to drop the inauguration plans  and instead hold talks with the President to heal divisions.

ELECTORAL JUSTICE

Mr Odinga has maintained he will only engage in dialogue about electoral justice with an ultimate goal of going back to the election.

And Attorney-General Githu Muigai warned that should the event take place, the opposition leader will face charges of treason, which carry a mandatory death penalty.

Nasa has not revealed the venue of Mr Odinga’s swearing in or whether it will be public at all.

But police could be caught off guard if it takes place outside Nairobi.

Without giving any reason, a security source said it was unlikely that Mr Odinga will be sworn in in Mombasa.

POLICE

However, in the likely event that the opposition goes ahead with the ceremony in another town, the source, who did not wish to be quoted discussing security matters, said police were under instructions to display “minimum force” unless the crowd at the swearing-in venue turns chaotic “to the extent of causing massive destruction”.

Mr Odinga has maintained that he won the August 8 presidential election and that his victory was stolen.

His successfully petitioned the result in the Supreme Court, which nullified the presidential election and called for a repeat poll on October 26.

Mr Kenyatta easily won the rerun after Mr Odinga pulled out, citing lack of electoral reforms to level the field.

The Supreme Court dismissed three petitions against the result, paving the way for Mr Kenyatta to be sworn in for his second and last term.

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