In Summary

  • You will still be able to use social media and surf the Internet.
  • Some 180,000 security agents will be deployed to all the 40,883 polling stations to secure 19.6 million voters as they elect their leaders.
  • To cast their ballots, voters will use a special kit that identifies them through their fingerprints.

The Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission and other State agencies have provided a glimpse of what election day on August 8 will look like.

You will still be able to use social media and surf the Internet.

These services will not be shut down, contrary to recent rumours, but individuals who use them to incite violence will face the music.

The country will probably see its biggest security deployment ever.

Some 180,000 security agents will be deployed to all the 40,883 polling stations to secure 19.6 million voters as they elect their leaders.

POLICE

Apart from the regular police, the administration police and General Service Unit, Kenya Wildlife Service and Kenya Forestry Service rangers will also be on duty to help deliver a safe and secure environment for Kenyans to exercise their democratic right to vote.

Dr Fred Matiang’i, the acting Cabinet secretary for Interior announced that annual leave for all security officers has been cancelled to enable the agencies to give full attention to the elections.

“Election is a serious business. Since our duty is to facilitate IEBC, we have decided to cancel leaves for all security officers so that they can take care of this important exercise,” Dr Matiang’i told a meeting of stakeholders on election preparedness at the Intercontinental Hotel, Nairobi.

CHAOS

The consultative meeting was convened by the Kenya Private Sector Alliance (Kepsa) and Mkenya Daima Initiative and the key state organs.

Dr Matiang’i said police have mapped the country and identified regions that are likely to be hit by chaos before and after elections, and warned politicians that they will not be spared if they are caught inciting their supporters to violence.

“Our biggest headache is politicians who hide behind their positions to break the law. We shall not respect those titles should any of them misbehave. We are committed to ensuring that we deliver on security in the election,” he said.

THREATS

Inspector-General of Police Joseph Boinnet said the National Police Service was aware of possible threats and that is why it had roped in KWS and KFS to ensure the law is enforced.

The number of officers to be deployed in an election has more than doubled.

In the 2013 General Election about 95,000 officers were deployed to secure the elections.

The increase in security officers is necessitated by the fact that the number of polling stations has also nearly doubled following the enactment of the Elections Act, which requires that no polling station shall have more than 700 voters.

BALLOT

The increase has also been due to the high stakes in the elections. On Monday, Mr Boinnet said voters will be expected to cast the ballot and immediately leave polling stations so as to avoid situations where tension could build up.

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