In Summary
  • Many politicians have been diagnosed with hypertension and stress-related conditions after losing elections.

  • President Uhuru Kenyatta and his arch-rival from Nasa Raila Odinga are not in the state they were before the polls.

  • Those who love their bottle had to stay sober longer.

The end of campaigns and subsequent elections on Tuesday came as a huge relief for politicians who were gunning for various offices following weeks of intense canvassing that not only left them gasping for financial redemption but also emotionally battered.

It has been a long tiresome journey. For the winner, the victory has soothed their blisters.

But for the losers, it is devastating. Most of them are yet to come to terms with the reality.

Many politicians have been diagnosed with hypertension and stress-related conditions after losing elections.

One of the candidates for a seat which was fiercely fought for was late for a scheduled media interview four days to the election day in what we later learnt was an overwhelming bout of fatigue.

CAMPAIGN RIGOURS

President Uhuru Kenyatta and his arch-rival from Nasa Raila Odinga are not in the state they were before the polls, the rigours of the campaign palpable on their faces with keen observers noting that both look older than they were when they went into the vote hunting mission.

Addressing supporters in one of the last rallies in Mombasa, Mr Odinga had a hoarse voice. Although younger, the President has equally had it rough, having to re-schedule some rallies in order to rejuvenate. 

Mr David Murathe, President Kenyatta’s close ally, says the need to showcase what he had accomplished in the last four-and-a-half years saw him go to all counties to seek a second term.

“It was important for him to go to the ground,” he said.

On the occasions he stayed away from State House, documents that needed his signatures were flown to where he was.

BODYGUARDS

Equally feeling relieved are their bodyguards and aides who have had to endure harsh terrain, hunger and thirst to see to it that their bosses are not only present at the rallies on time but safely so.

Mr Chris Mandu, an aide to one of the Nasa principals Moses Wetang’ula, expressed optimism that the sacrifice was not in vain.

“Having to make do with little resources, it has been like going to war,” he said.

An officer attached to the presidential escort team offered a glimpse into the lives during the period.

“If it was religion, you would equate it to fasting. There are many things we had to forego,” he said.

STAY SOBER

Those who love their bottle had to stay sober longer as many other recreational endeavours were put on hold.

It was more challenging for them in the more than 350 joint rallies Mr Kenyatta and his Deputy William Ruto addressed together. On all the occasions, it was a security nightmare ensuring that both Mr Kenyatta and his deputy were safe.

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