In Summary
  • Dutch football fans are in mourning after the once mighty Oranje failed to qualify for the 2018 World Cup, plunging the inventors of "total football" into a collective bout of soul-searching.
  • Not even two goals from retiring legend Arjen Robben against Sweden could save the stuttering Dutch football machine, which now has the dubious distinction of failing to make it to two major football competitions in a row.
  • After Tuesday's match, Dutch captain and long-time workhorse Robben announced his retirement from the national team — marking the end of an era which saw him and other top Dutch players such as Wesley Sneijder, Robin van Persie and Rafael van der Vaart threaten to win the sports' greatest prizes.

THE HAGUE

Dutch football fans are in mourning after the once mighty Oranje failed to qualify for the 2018 World Cup, plunging the inventors of "total football" into a collective bout of soul-searching.

Not even two goals from retiring legend Arjen Robben against Sweden could save the stuttering Dutch football machine, which now has the dubious distinction of failing to make it to two major football competitions in a row.

After Tuesday's match, Dutch captain and long-time workhorse Robben announced his retirement from the national team — marking the end of an era which saw him and other top Dutch players such as Wesley Sneijder, Robin van Persie and Rafael van der Vaart threaten to win the sports' greatest prizes.

Yet almost exactly two years ago to the day, Holland got their first nasty surprise when a 3-2 home defeat against a 10-man Czech Republic saw them fail to qualify for Euro 2016.

Netherlands' team players react following their Fifa World Cup 2018 football, Group A, qualification match against and Sweden at the Amsterdam Arena in Amsterdam on October 10, 2017. PHOTO | EMMANUEL DUNAND |

Netherlands' team players react following their Fifa World Cup 2018 football, Group A, qualification match against and Sweden at the Amsterdam Arena in Amsterdam on October 10, 2017. PHOTO | EMMANUEL DUNAND |

Tuesday evening the "melancholy atmosphere was complete: the 2018 World Cup in Russia will be without the Netherlands, the number two in 2010 and the number three in 2014", the authoritative daily De Volkskrant said.

DYING OF SHAME

"I am dying of shame because of the Dutch 11," wrote columnist Hugo Borst in the Algemeen Dagblad daily tabloid, adding the team has "lost its creativity and daring".

"No other team in the universe is playing as wide and backwards as many times as the Dutch," he said.

"Instead, the ball should be going hard, straight and forward, pure and simple. Playing wide and backwards are done by average footballers lacking self-confidence," said Borst.

Marco van der Heide, a former professional player at SC Cambuur and football commentator, agreed.

"I think our biggest weakness lies at the tactical level," he told AFP.

Netherlands' coach Dick Advocaat reacts following their Fifa World Cup 2018 football, Group A, qualification match against Sweden at the Amsterdam Arena in Amsterdam on October 10, 2017. PHOTO | EMMANUEL DUNAND |

Netherlands' coach Dick Advocaat reacts following their Fifa World Cup 2018 football, Group A, qualification match against Sweden at the Amsterdam Arena in Amsterdam on October 10, 2017. PHOTO | EMMANUEL DUNAND |

"There are extreme differences in how we are doing things here and how it's done outside the Netherlands," he said.

"For instance, in the Netherlands we continue to defend by covering opposing players, while most other teams including smaller countries now use the principle of zonal defending.

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