In Summary
  • The race for the Giro d'Italia's pink jersey risks being overshadowed by a political rumpus over the 2018 edition's departure from Jerusalem, with Israeli protests and US diplomatic policy threatening carnage.
  • The cycling Grand Tour has already run into difficulty long before the first pedal is due to be pushed on May 4, first by labelling the city "west Jerusalem" rather than Jerusalem, due to conflicting Israeli and Palestinian claims over the Holy Land.
  • And the political headache has threatened to turn into a migraine over US President Donald Trump's recognition on Wednesday of Jerusalem as Israel's capital, while pledging to to move the US embassy there from Tel Aviv, provoking a torrent of protest from Middle East and Muslim countries such as Jordan, Iran and Turkey, as well as both major Palestinian factions.

ROME

The race for the Giro d'Italia's pink jersey risks being overshadowed by a political rumpus over the 2018 edition's departure from Jerusalem, with Israeli protests and US diplomatic policy threatening carnage.

The cycling Grand Tour has already run into difficulty long before the first pedal is due to be pushed on May 4, first by labelling the city "west Jerusalem" rather than Jerusalem, due to conflicting Israeli and Palestinian claims over the Holy Land.

And the political headache has threatened to turn into a migraine over US President Donald Trump's recognition on Wednesday of Jerusalem as Israel's capital, while pledging to to move the US embassy there from Tel Aviv, provoking a torrent of protest from Middle East and Muslim countries such as Jordan, Iran and Turkey, as well as both major Palestinian factions.

Giro d'Italia race director Mauro Vegni said in September that the first three days of the 101st edition would be a time trial in Jerusalem followed by two sprint stages ending in Tel Aviv and Eilat, before the race returns to Italy for the final 18 stages.

It will be the first time any of cycling's three Grand Tours — the others being the Tour de France and Vuelta a Espana — start outside of Europe and fans were thrilled.

Many also saw it as a homage to Italy's Gino Bartoli, a much-loved triple Giro winner who was recognised in 2013 as a "Righteous Among the Nations" — someone who had helped shield Jews from the Nazis in the Second World War.

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