In Summary

  • I met one gullible golfer last Saturday after he had been wrongfully penalised on account of such Rules at Limuru Country Club.

I took my first train ride to Mombasa when I was 12 years old.

The trains then were not as fast as the Madaraka Express. The ride from Nairobi to Mombasa took fourteen hours. For my scouting friends and I, the long ride was not a problem at all.

We had a whole carriage to ourselves and the games and stories that we shared kept us thoroughly entertained for the entire trip.

That was until one of the kids, who always seemed to know everything, started telling us stories of the genies in Mombasa.

He told us that the genies would turn themselves into black cats that spoke especially if one threw stones at them.

The genies could even turn into 100 shillings notes (this was the highest denomination note at the time) and if one picked it up it would politely ask to be returned to where it was picked.

These tales of genies scared some of us so much that we were not our usual selves. When we arrived at Tudor Primary School where we were staying, we were on very good behaviour so as not to offend any genies. We did not even dare kick pebbles on the ground lest they turned out to be genies.

There are few golfers today who, due to their failure to read the Rules of Golf, are being harassed by others on fictitious Rules that are akin to the genie stories.

I met one such gullible golfer last Saturday after he had been wrongfully penalised on account of such Rules at Limuru Country Club.

The golfer’s tee shot ended up in the rough in an area that had safari ants. The club’s Local Rules provide for relief under the immovable obstruction Rule.

The fellow competitor did not have a problem with the relief from the safari ants. Everyone who has had the misfortune standing in an area infested with these feisty little creatures knows how fast they may be forced to disrobe when a few manage to crawl up the legs and perform synchronised attacks.
The problem came after the player picked up the ball and dropped it in an area he considered to be the nearest point of relief.

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