In Summary
  • Slightly over a week ago, world attention was riveted on two clubs whose tacticians were on the verge of losing their jobs for what the respective fan bases thought was poor coaching.
  • However, by the week’s end the two gentlemen had acquitted themselves well and silenced the doomsayers.
  • In faraway England, Arsenal’s Arsene Wenger was a wanted man as many of the club’s supporters were waiting for the slightest chance to say au revoir to the Frenchman.

Slightly over a week ago, world attention was riveted on two clubs whose tacticians were on the verge of losing their jobs for what the respective fan bases thought was poor coaching.

However, by the week’s end the two gentlemen had acquitted themselves well and silenced the doomsayers.

In faraway England, Arsenal’s Arsene Wenger was a wanted man as many of the club’s supporters were waiting for the slightest chance to say au revoir to the Frenchman.

However, come Sunday May 7 and Wenger confounded both friend and foe when he led his troops to wallop their longtime nemesis Manchester United 2-0 sending the thousands of Arsenal fans (for the record I support neither team; my loyalty is to Gor Mahia and Gor Mahia alone) around the globe into frenzied celebrations.

Before Wenger did his thing in England, I am sure he must have watched as Gor Mahia massacred AFC Leopards a few hours earlier!

Building up to the derby Gor Mahia coach Marcelo Ferreira was under intense pressure from a section of fans who felt the Brazilian was underperforming.

The pressure was so much so that even a club official threatened that they would give the man a one way ticket to the favelas of Rio de Janeiro if he did not deliver the derby.

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