In Summary
  • While the youth continued to languish in poverty and getting frustrated in endless job search, government employment opportunities were somehow available to senior citizens.
  • Everywhere you look you are met with the hopelessness of the youth.
  • The face of the Kenyan youth today is a young population on the edge.
  • This is a worrying trend as it portrays the future of Kenya as bleak.

A few days ago, I went through a post on one of my Facebook friend’s timeline, where she had pieced together recent photos from the front page of one of the dailies, showing President Uhuru Kenyatta’s recent appointments of senior citizens into public service positions.

Beside it were three other old photos of the president doing the dab with a group of young men who had visited him at the State House.

Her point was that while the youth continued to languish in poverty and getting frustrated in endless job search, government employment opportunities were somehow available to senior citizens.

ECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT

Whether those positions ought to have been given to the youth, and if indeed that could have reduced the youth unemployment margins is a story for another day, but it is a fact that the youth of this country are in dire need of economic empowerment.

And you do not need a complicated and comprehensive research to comprehend the truth of this matter – it’s all over our faces, isn’t it?

In Nairobi, there is this group of young people all over the city who beg to brush your shoes. Those who cannot secure a tiny corner within the central business district look elsewhere. You probably have seen them in Gikomba market with buckets of dirty water and sponges, targeting people coming from the muddy alleys of the market. Their hope is to get at least Sh20 for every pair of shoe they clean.

As you walk towards Moi Avenue at any time of the day, you won’t help but notice tens of young Kenyans, mostly men, standing outside buildings, trying to persuade women to pop in for a nail treat.

And as the sun begins to set, just take a stroll towards Tom Mboya Street and will meet street vendors, also young people, occupying different spots of building alleys with mobile food carts, selling sausages, smokies, samosas and boiled eggs.

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