In Summary
  • While coast politicians argue about foreign junkets, their constituents spend hours looking for water to bathe their children.
  • Pope Francis has given new life to the social justice agenda and given recognition and a voice to proponents of liberation theology.

The Catholic Church has just released the schedule of Pope Francis’ visit to the country.

I was thrilled to hear that he would visit the parish of Kangemi but would have been absolutely ecstatic had he chosen Bangala, Mombasa, for his meeting with ‘the church of the poor’.

After four successive days without electricity and two weeks without water, the residents might have expected to receive essential services for at least the duration of his visit.

When there is a power outage in Tudor, Nyali, Lavington or Muthaiga, Kenya Power repair within hours and when water is disconnected they switch on their boreholes or order water tankers.

The poor pay the same rate for electricity and water as the rich, but they are the last to be served.

While coast politicians argue about foreign junkets, their constituents spend hours looking for water to bathe their children.

Since health was devolved the poor have only benefited with free condoms and free mosquito nets.

Denying teachers their September salaries and treating a most noble calling with contempt indicates that Jubilee views educators of the nation’s children as ‘half citizens’ while increasing the gap between the one per cent elites and the 99 percent remnants.

Teaching now can be considered a poor profession.

SOCIAL JUSTICE
Back to the Pontiff. Everyone expected that he would have one public mass; the question was what else he would include on his pastoral visit.

His decision not to visit Holy Family Basilica or the little Vatican in Karen/Langata sent a strong message to the church and the public.

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