In Summary
  • Despite having none of this technical checks and balances, the Kibra ODM primaries went on successfully without the usual drama that accompanies ODM primaries in their perceived strongholds

It was interesting to watch the primaries for nominating the ODM Kibra candidate. What stood out for me was how absolutely manual the whole process was.

Nothing fancy, compared to what we keep demanding from big brother IEBC.

ODM PRIMARIES

There was no electronic Voter ID (eVID) equipment to biometrically validate that the person voting was indeed the same one who is a registered and bona fide member of ODM.

Otherwise any non-ODM member in the name of Onyango, Wanjiku or Wafula may just show up and vote in the primaries. Or even worse, they could actually be members who fail to show up -  but someone else simply votes on their behalf.

There was no results transmission system (RTS) to ensure that tallied values captured in close to the two hundred polling stations in Kibra were electronically transmitted to a public portal as soon as the counting ended.

Otherwise you end up with the mischief of conflicting figures between what was announced at the polling station and what actually arrives and is reported at the constituency tallying centre.

Despite having none of this technical checks and balances, the Kibra ODM primaries went on successfully without the usual drama that accompanies ODM primaries in their perceived strongholds.

What is even more surprising is that the losing candidates seem to have no complaints so far and this maybe interpreted as vote of confidence in the process, however manual it was.

Which begs the question – do we really need all the expensive technology in our national general elections?

BIG ELECTION BUDGETS

Our election budgets keep growing exponentially after every five years while trust in the results declared keeps reducing, particularly for the Presidential contest.

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