In Summary
  • Kenya has made significant progress in reducing some of these threats and helping some species to recover.
  • Reports indicate that an elephant can live up to 70 years without human interference.
  • Animals are so important to human life and the eco-system that extinction of seemingly small animals such as ants could spell total collapse of human life.

The steep increase in the number of protected animals that are hunted down and killed for their parts has drawn focus to the wild and prompted official measures to combat poaching — efforts that have been intensified of late.

In Kenya, the causes of species loss have varied through time and include hunting, pollution, invasive species, habitat loss and climate change.

These generally mirror the threats to animal species around the world. Kenya has, however, made significant progress in reducing some of these threats and helping some species to recover.

Locally, one of the most endangered animals is the elephant. Reports indicate that an elephant can live up to 70 years without human interference. Yet they face extinction due to poaching.

Animals are so important to human life and the eco-system that extinction of seemingly small animals such as ants could spell total collapse of human life.

GIANT MAMMALS

With the few remaining species of giant mammals — including elephants — largely confined to Africa, it’s up to us to know better and do better.

Man and elephant co-existence makes for some interesting facts. For example, during the dry season, elephants use their tusks to dig for water.

That not only allows them to survive in dry environments but also provides water for other animals that share these harsh habitats.

Did you also know that seeds, such as those of the Acacia plant, have a 90 per cent chance of germinating if deposited in elephant dung?

On the savannahs, elephants feeding on tree sprouts and shrubs help to keep the plains open and able to support the game that inhabit them.

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