In Summary
  • You will have to jump 21 hurdles on your dream to make counties embrace your innovation.
  • Stringent regulations and red tape dispirit hundreds of innovative brains and turn away external innovators.

Despite Kenya’s unmatched innovation potential in Africa, it has been held back by numerous snags that ensure it’s prowess does not match global technology centres such as San Jose, Beijing, Berlin, Tel Aviv and Boston.

It is a tough life being an innovator in Kenya as the government’s lack of goodwill, coupled with depressing laws and lengthy procedures, pile on you and you eventually give up.

You will have to jump 21 hurdles on your dream to make counties embrace your innovation. Getting approval from the National Treasury is one of the longest procedures.

INNOVATIVE PROJECTS

Consequently, the country loses much talent to the streets, and innovative projects meant to generate income for the high percentage of unemployed youth remain a dream. Many goods and services never reach the market, businesses created or new government revenue streams actualised.

All this arises from abysmal government policies and unwillingness, reluctance and disinclination from state agencies tasked with creating a conducive environment for innovation to induce technological advancements.

Stringent regulations and red tape dispirit hundreds of innovative brains and turn away external innovators. In the manufacturing sector, for instance, we know that electricity is the key determinant of growth and any innovation that reduces its cost would greatly boost revenues, industrial growth and jobs.

DIGITAL PATH

Nowadays, the digital path that a country takes is what defines its brand. Anybody would adore a country that produces quality goods and services but, despite 3D printing coming to Kenya as early as 2013, we have not seen commercial use of the technology in the private sector.

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