In Summary
  • With the election behind us and at least a modicum of rain, it is tempting to think this year will be kinder.
  • That gargantuan challenge requires action and walking the talk as opposed to a string of promises as issued last year.
  • The informal sector will absorb many more but there is still a huge number of unemployed or under-employed youth.
  • Growing the economy and increasing the space for greater creation of gainful opportunities is one.

Many Kenyans are happy to see the back of 2017. The endless politics replete with uncertainties, coupled with a lengthy drought, made it a tough and gruelling year.

With the election behind us and at least a modicum of rain, it is tempting to think this year will be kinder. In some ways, it may be — especially if we are not subjected to the level of adversary politics we had last year.

Certainly, the dawn of 2018 comes with raised expectations. But the latter is a double-edged sword: It puts pressure on meeting, or at least satisfying, those increased expectations. That gargantuan challenge requires action and walking the talk as opposed to a string of promises as issued last year.

Honing in on the country’s demographics helps to comprehend the heart of the challenge. Eighty per cent of the population is below 35. Over 800,000 jobseekers hit the road each year but less than 7 per cent find formal employment.

UNEMPLOYMENT

The informal sector will absorb many more but there is still a huge number of unemployed or under-employed youth. More than half of them are unemployed and the younger they are the greater the chance of unemployment.

Then there is the disparity of wealth factor. Around 62 per cent of the country’s wealth is controlled by 10,000 people. The top 10 per cent of households control around 40 per cent of the income; conversely the bottom tenth control less than 1 per cent.

But straddling the two is the dispossessed factor. Indeed, the younger you are, the more likely you are to be in the bottom 10 per cent.

The youth ‘quake’, disparity of wealth and dispossessed factors are not unique to Kenya. They surface around the world in countries as varied as Saudi Arabia and Iran — an interesting irony as the two are sworn enemies of each other.

One common thread is that the country is ultimately controlled by ruling oligarchies such as the House of Saud of Saudi Arabia or the Ayatollahs in Iran. These often elderly men live in a rarefied world that is out of touch with the bulging younger populations.

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