In Summary
  • We are calling attention to the IEBC because its stability holds the future to the country’s leadership.

Two years have elapsed since Kenyans went for the General Election whose outcomes nearly precipitated turmoil.

The country has since returned to normalcy and the deep seated political acrimony subsided.

Indeed, the handshake between the erstwhile political rivals President Uhuru Kenyatta and opposition leader Raila Odinga in March last year diametrically changed the equation and ushered an era of cooperation and camaraderie.

But there is a festering problem that is yet to be resolved. The Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC) which bungled the elections, a fact proclaimed by the Supreme Court, has not been fixed and it seems the public has moved on and forgot about it.

If it failed then when it had a semblance of structure, it is worse off today when it is a shell.

For more than a year, the commission has operated with only three commissioners, no substantive chief executive and a thoroughly demoralised and nearly dysfunctional secretariat.

Attempts to recruit a new chief executive have run into headwinds.

KEY AGENCY

We are calling attention to the IEBC because its stability holds the future to the country’s leadership.

Since the first multiparty election in Kenya in 1992, and with the exception of 2002 when Kanu was vanquished, every electoral cycle has been traumatic. In 2007, the country nearly burnt to ashes following chaotic polls.

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