In Summary
  • The survey raises serious questions as to whether the country is really prepared for the new curriculum.
  • Such a hardline position is discouraging and negates the need for the meetings.
  • It is in the ministry’s best interest to accommodate the public’s views.

Preliminary results of an assessment of Grade Three pupils provides a reality check for the drivers of the Competency-Based Curriculum that is being rolled out in schools.

The findings, released last week, indicate that half of the pupils do not attain the 50 per cent benchmark in English, Kiswahili and mathematics and that a majority have weak comprehension skills.

It says the situation is much worse in semi-arid areas and that boys are falling behind girls in learning outcomes.

The survey raises serious questions as to whether the country is really prepared for the new curriculum.

HUGE WEAKNESS

For instance, the findings suggest a huge weakness in the school system, especially the quality of teachers, their pedagogical skills, pupil engagement in the learning process and infrastructure.

Granted, there is no perfect time to change a schooling system. But it is as if the government is putting the cart before the horse by prioritising the shift at the expense of addressing serious gaps in the system. If learning outcomes are already falling below average, would it not be more prudent to address the reasons for that in an incremental way instead of commencing on an overhaul that risks being bogged down by the same weaknesses?

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