In Summary
  • Payoff follows mediation by the dispute resolution office of the World Bank’s IFC 
  • Out of the 36 farmers who were compensated, eight later rejected the deal and are expected to take their case to court this month.
  • Bidco was cleared of charges of environmental degradation by a Ugandan court.
  • However, the UNDP in 2016 said that there had been flaws in the process it used to admit the palm oil project

Farmers whose land was acquired for a controversial Bidco palm oil project in Uganda have been compensated.

The payoff to the 36 farmers follows mediation by the dispute resolution office of the World Bank’s International Finance Corporation (IFC). 

A Ugandan environmental lobby had last year filed the case at the IFC’s ombudsman on behalf of the Bugala Farmers Association (BFA), claiming that their land was grabbed and that Bidco had degraded the environment to pave way for palm oil production.

The case went into dispute resolution.

A report by the Compliance Advisor Ombudsman (CAO) published last month shows 36 of the 38 farmers named in the case received compensation for “appropriation of land”. Two of the farmers “could not be traced”

“It was agreed that the BFA would receive a lumpsum from the landlord working in collaboration with the company, which they would then allocate to each complainant based on a formula they devised,” says the CAO report.

The landlord in question remains unnamed though the documents specify that he sold the land to the Ugandan government which was later allocated to Bidco.

Farmers who were still living on the contested land would be given titles for their parcels. 

Out of the 36 farmers who were compensated, eight later rejected the deal and are expected to take their case to court this month.

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