In Summary
  • Kenya’s ICT stakeholders have filed a petition opposing the convention from adopting the law so, citing a need to protect the thriving Web space from restrictions.
  • Among the contents of the convention is that a person or a corporate organisation engaging in electronic financial transactions must provide full identity information, including PIN, and address information.
  • The petitioners say the requirement is costly, risky, and it remains unclear how such data will be protected and how confidentiality will be maintained.

Kenya will support ratification of an African Union cyber security convention that local lobbyists say poses a threat to growth of the Internet in the country.

Speaking at the ongoing Cyber Security conference in Nairobi yesterday, Information, Communications and Technology Cabinet Secretary Fred Matiang’i said he expects President Uhuru Kenyatta to attend the AU meeting in January where the draft convention will be adopted.

“We must work with our neighbours in Comesa in ratifiying the AU Cyber security convention. Our President will go to AU in January for the convention,” Mr Matiangi said.

Kenya’s ICT stakeholders have filed a petition opposing the convention from adopting the law so, citing a need to protect the thriving Web space from restrictions.

Stakeholders such as Google, iHub, iLab Africa and Strathmore University Centre for internet protocol and IT law (CIPIT) are among those pressing the AU to review the document.

“We are calling for individuals and local organisations to join us in this. If member states ratify it and anyone goes against it, that would be a violation of the law,” Strathmore Centre for intellectual property managing director (in charge of the petition), Ms Marcela Sinda, said at a previous meeting.

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