In Summary
  • Already, one in three people in the world suffers from micronutrient deficiencies, meaning that they lack the requisite vitamins and minerals for proper growth and development.
  • To deal with this, scientists are preaching agricultural biodiversity, which means embracing all crops including their wild relatives, trees, livestock and landscapes as a source of nutritious foods.
  • Agricultural biodiversity is also a source of essential traits for breeding stress-tolerant, nutritious crops and animal breeds and is often adapted to indigenous and low-input agricultural techniques.

With a rapidly changing climate starring extreme weather, the possibility of food insecurity and prevalent dietary deficiencies have never loomed larger.

Scientists say that going back to our roots and to the forgotten foods from our past could help turn the tide.

Already, one in three people in the world suffers from micronutrient deficiencies, meaning that they lack the requisite vitamins and minerals for proper growth and development.

Forecasts by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change show that climate change could lessen agricultural production to two per cent, while demand for agricultural produce increases by approximately 14 per cent every decade.

To deal with this, scientists are preaching agricultural biodiversity, which means embracing all crops including their wild relatives, trees, livestock and landscapes as a source of nutritious foods.

“Agrobiodiversity, which makes up the edible plant and animal species that feeds us as humans, holds the key to our future food security. But we are failing to protect and tap into its potential to transform our food systems for the better,” says Ann Tutwiler, the director general of Bioversity International.

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