In Summary
  • Production of milk, according to the farmer, depends on feeds, vaccination and quality mating.
  • Juma started the venture with 30 indigenous goats but he realised they were uneconomical.
  • The instructor at the International Youth Fellowship Taekwondo Academy in Kisumu says goats are good for the urban farmer who has a small piece of land.

Ibrahim Juma dips his right hand in a bucket he is carrying, scoops some dairy meal and puts it in a feeding trough in the goat pen.

The farmer repeats the task five times and soon he gets the attention of four dairy goats he wants to milk in his quarter acre Kisumu farm.

The big-horned animals had made frantic attempts to try and escape from their wooden pen when they saw him carrying an aluminium bucket for milking.

“Goats are not like cows. They can be stubborn, particularly when they know you want to milk them. They recognise this bucket,” says the farmer.

Juma keeps 17 dairy goats at his home in Migosi, Kisumu, four of which are lactating.

The goats are of the Saanen, Toggenburg and Alpine breeds.

“I get 19 litres of milk a day from the four goats. Each produces between three and six litres of milk in a day that I sell for Sh150 a litre.”

Production of milk, according to the farmer, depends on feeds, vaccination and quality mating.

“I went for dairy goats because I wanted to be different and I knew they do not demand a lot of space. I realised they were the perfect animals to keep on my quarter acre in an urban area under the zero-grazing system.”

He feeds them dairy meal, napier grass and shrubs that he gets from the neighbourhood.

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