In Summary
  • The conference was sponsored by TrustAfrica, an advocacy organisation.
  • The future of food security and sufficiency in the world depends principally on what Africa does with its agriculture and especially with the involvement of its young people.
  • Apart from the limited participation of the youth in agriculture, the delegates outlined and discussed a number of other reasons farming tends to stagnate in Africa.

Despite being arguably the biggest and richest continent on the planet, Africa does not enjoy the involvement of its strongest force in agriculture – the youth.

Agribusiness experts recently converged on the Rwandan capital city, Kigali, to deliberate on what ails Africa’s smallholder agriculture and the need to listen to the farmer.

The experts said the continent’s great potential is hampered by the ageing population of smallholders working on their fragmented holdings while the youth move to towns, cities and western countries.

The conference was sponsored by TrustAfrica, an advocacy organisation. In his opening remarks, TrustAfrica executive secretary Ebrima Sall stressed the importance of transforming agriculture to make it lucrative and globally competitive.

Describing Africa as the continent of paradoxes, Sall said a shared ambition to transform agriculture would be the only way to stem the tide of Africa’s dependence on imports, now standing at 87 per cent.

He added that the future of food security and sufficiency in the world depends principally on what Africa does with its agriculture and especially with the involvement of its young people.

GREATEST POTENTIAL

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