In Summary
  • The club has half-acre of vegetables, mainly collard greens (sukuma wiki) which they sell to teachers and the school’s neighbours.
  • Besides inspiration from the hands-on experience, some 4K Club members have developed interest along the agricultural career lines.
  • The school has one-acre fodder, which has five grass varieties including Boma Rhodes, lucern, napier, desmodium and Sudan.
  • With schools closed, the students have made arrangement to work on the farm in turns. Besides, there is a worker who takes care of the cow.

As most children played in the field at Sidindi Primary School in Siaya County during the 4pm games time break, members of the Kuungana, Kufanya, Kusaidia Kenya (4K) Club were on the farm.

Some were watering vegetables, others checking on a tree nursery, while the rest were on fodder farm or attending to their dairy animals.

This is the routine for the 100 members of the club, who have embraced farming not only as a way of earning income, but also nurturing their dream careers in agribusiness.

The club has half-acre of vegetables, mainly collard greens (sukuma wiki) which they sell to teachers and the school’s neighbours.

They also have about 500 eucalyptus seedlings which they sell at Sh10 each. Last year, they had the same number of seedlings, some of which were planted within the school’s compound, others distributed for members to plant at their homes while they sold some to neighbours around the school.

Part of the income from the agribusiness is spent on buying school uniform for needy members while the rest is saved for re-investment in the next season.

“Last year we earned Sh5,000 from both vegetables and seedlings, but this year we expect the income to double,” said Julian Onyango, a teacher, who doubles as the 4K Club’s patron.

While the income might appear low, the impact of the project on the children’s future cannot be underrated.

Besides inspiration from the hands-on experience, some 4K Club members have developed interest along the agricultural career lines.

“I would like to be a commercial farmer when I grow up,” said 12-year-old Faith Beatrice, adding that she specifically would like to concentrate on horticulture and dairy farming.

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