In Summary
  • The revival of the Dandora, Sotik and Eldoret New Kenya Cooperative Creameries processing plants rekindles more hope to small-scale dairy farmers, who make up to 80 per cent of total dairy producers and produce 56 per cent of total milk.
  • Kenya Dairy Board’s 2018 data shows that the milk volumes are from 4.2 million hybrid cattle, 14 million Zebu, 2.9 million camels and 400,000 dairy goats.
  • Githunguri in Kiambu county is a practical case study of how a community-based initiative can revolutionise the dairy industry.
  • Already, there is goodwill from the national government to promote the dairy sector through its programme to procure and distribute 900 milk coolers to dairy groups countrywide.

Kenya takes pride in having the largest dairy industry in Sub-Saharan Africa. The sector grew tremendously since its liberalisation in the 1990s, leading to rapid growth of the informal milk trade.

Milk intake by the formal sector went down due to unpredictable prices, mismanagement and delayed payment by the processors.

Dairy co-operatives, which used to be an integral part of the formal milk collection and marketing, were reduced to buyers of last resort.

The revival of the Dandora, Sotik and Eldoret New Kenya Cooperative Creameries processing plants rekindles more hope to small-scale dairy farmers, who make up to 80 per cent of total dairy producers and produce 56 per cent of total milk.

The farmers are constrained by expensive feeds and supplements, delayed payments, poor rural infrastructure, lack of collateral for loans, low technical skills on husbandry practices, reduced access to veterinary and artificial insemination services.

Yet the dairy sector is significant as it offers opportunities for employment along the value chain from drivers, mechanics, milk vendors, retailers, farmers and processors.

Kenya Dairy Board’s 2018 data shows that the milk volumes are from 4.2 million hybrid cattle, 14 million Zebu, 2.9 million camels and 400,000 dairy goats.

In line with Food and Agriculture Organisation projections, by 2050, the demand for milk in Kenya will increase to 13.3 billion litres annually.

COMPETITIVE DAIRY HUBS

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