In Summary
  • There are fears the raiders plan to stage attacks in Turkana, Baringo, West Pokot, Samburu, Laikipia and Elgeyo-Marakwet counties.
  • The discovery of oil in the Turkana-West Pokot boundary has escalated the disputes.
  • Disarming of police reservists has exposed areas on the Baringo-Turkana border to frequent attacks and cattle raids

Security agencies in the North Rift will this month start mopping up illegal firearms, Rift Valley Regional Commissioner George Natembeya has said.

Bandits and cattle rustlers are allegedly in possession of sophisticated weapons with which they plan to stage attacks in Turkana, Baringo, West Pokot, Samburu, Laikipia and Elgeyo-Marakwet counties.

“Operations targeting individuals who have not surrendered the weapons will begin this month,” Mr Natembeya told the Nation, adding that those who have not surrendered their firearms “should brace themselves for consequences”.

BANDITS

“Bandits should have taken advantage of the amnesty to surrender their weapons,” said Mr Natembeya.

Bandits access weapons from neighbouring countries, leading to a spike in cattle raids among pastoralists in the North Rift

The conflicts are fuelled by increased demand for crops and pasture on the banks of River Kerio.

The discovery of oil in the Turkana-West Pokot boundary has escalated the disputes.

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