In Summary
  • Justice M’Inoti said magistrates and prosecutors lack proper training in handling such cases.
  • The training has been organised by Attorney General Alliance-Africa Alliance Partnership.
  • Mr Green lauded Kenya for implementing the Counter-Trafficking in Persons Act of 2010.

The government has been challenged to help tackle the human trafficking menace in Kenya by setting aside funds for training of Judiciary staff to prosecute such cases.

Kenya accounts for about 328,000 cases of human trafficking.

Speaking in Nairobi on Monday, Director of Judiciary Training Institute Kathurima M’Inoti pointed out that the prosecution of human trafficking cases in the country is slow pace as most judges, magistrates and prosecutors lack proper training in handling such cases.

PROSECUTION CHALLENGING

Justice M’Inoti said prosecution of human trafficking cases is even more challenging because of the international angle and the many people involved hence the need for capacity building to ensure the cases are prosecuted and concluded expeditiously as the Constitution requires.

“There is general agreement that as a country, we have several cases both as source and origin of human trafficking and that explains why we are focusing on it. It affects the poor and the vulnerable,” said Mr M’Inoti.

He was speaking at the opening ceremony of a three-day human trafficking and electronic evidence training workshop for over 50 Kenyan magistrates at Utalii Hotel.

TRAINING

The training has been organised by Attorney General Alliance-Africa Alliance Partnership (AGA-AAP) in collaboration with the Judiciary Training Institute and The British High Commission.

Mr M’Inoti said the training will see the magistrates get a better grasp of the legal framework that regulates human trafficking offences, international, national and various methods used in effective investigations and prosecutions of the offences as well as prevention methods.

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