In Summary
  • Dr Aura said the project seeks to strengthen justice system among the administrators.  
  • High fees charged by lawyers has made legal services inaccessible by the poor.  
  • Chiefs cited insecurity, lack of powers to arrest drug peddlers and increasing illicit brews.

More than 40 chiefs from six Nakuru sub-counties have benefited from legal aid training.

The administrators were drawn from Nakuru West, Subukia, Naivasha, Molo, Bahati and Rongai.

VIOLENCE

“The main objective of the training is to impact skills to the chiefs to enable them mitigate in human rights cases, gender-based violence, and resolve other family problems amicably within their jurisdictions,” said Dr Ruth Aura on Wednesday.

Dr Aura, who is also the Egerton University Dean of the Faculty of Law, said the project seeks to strengthen the justice system among the administrators.  

“Some of the residents, due to poverty, are unable to access justice but, once we empower the chiefs with legal aid knowledge, they will help bridge the justice gap at the grassroots,” said Dr Aura.

She said such courses are critical since Kenya is evaluated on its response to the needs of its citizens at international forums.

“The chiefs have an important role to play in ensuring the poor are not marginalised and blocked from accessing justice and that is why we are giving them legal training,” said Dr Aura.

Dr Aura said the university is committed to taking the law to the people. She said high fees charged by lawyers has made legal services inaccessible by the poor.  

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