In Summary
  • The women handed President Kenyatta the copy of the newspaper through their ward Rep Moses Ndung’u Kamau to help them get title deeds.

  • The frail women, most of them ailing, cannot read the headline: ‘Mzee settles 1,500 families’

When President Uhuru Kenyatta made a historic address to Nakuru County Assembly on August 14, surviving members of Kiambogo Nyakinyua dance troupe were holding a prayer meeting under a tree at Elementaita Ward.

The women had a photocopy of the Daily Nation of October 14, 1976.

The copy of the Daily Nation that cost Sh1 then, might save them the agony of waiting for title deeds for the land that they were given by Mzee Jomo Kenyatta 43 years ago.

TITLE DEEDS

The women handed President Kenyatta the copy of the newspaper through their MCA Moses Ndung’u Kamau to help them get title deeds.

And while other leaders seized the opportunity to put before the Head of State a list of issues they wanted him to address, Mr Ndung’u took President Kenyatta down memory lane.

“Mr President these Nyakinyua dancers from Elementaita Ward used to entertain your father. They have been waiting for title deeds of the land given to them by founding father of the nation Mzee Jomo Kenyatta. This is a copy of the Daily Nation to prove that indeed they were given the land by Mzee Kenyatta,” said Mr Ndung’u.

Mzee Kenyatta died in 1978.

The frail women, most of them ailing, cannot read the headline: ‘Mzee settles 1,500 families’

But what excites them most despite their fast fading eye sights is a front page photo of Mzee Kenyatta handing them 15, 600 acres Kiambogo farm some 30km away from Nakuru Town.

When this newspaper was published, President Uhuru Kenyatta was barely 15-years-old.

TRADITIONAL REGALIA

The dance troupe meet every Wednesday dressed in full traditional regalia they wore as they entertained Mzee Kenyatta at State House Nakuru and at his Gatundu home.

Every wrinkle on their faces tell a story of their struggle for survival and hope. Decades of history is hidden in their memories when they speak.

Despite their weak eye sights, they peruse the paper as if reading it every time they meet. 

They then put the treasured copy of Daily Nation   into a brown envelop and keep it safe as it is the only available document to prove land ownership.

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