In Summary
  • He was a most unlikely feminist. He spoke about initiations in his day – how boys were secluded and told that women didn’t mean much, and that a man’s strength came from a woman’s weakness.

  • He went on to speak about gender equality, the strengths of both genders and how society can benefit from it.

I attended a mpumiro (a ceremony during which boys who have undergone initiation are re-introduced to the community) in Marimanti, Tharaka Nithi county a few weeks ago.

Tharaka women know how to throw a party – and they can dance. But the highlight, for me, was a man who looked to be about 70-years-old, who gave a speech.

He was a most unlikely feminist. He spoke about initiations in his day – how boys were secluded and told that women didn’t mean much, and that a man’s strength came from a woman’s weakness.

He went on to speak about gender equality, the strengths of both genders and how society can benefit from it.

I had a wide grin on my face when he finished – not just because I was impressed by his views, but because this man refused to let how he was raised shape his attitudes towards life. He allowed himself to think outside the box, explored the options that were out there for him and went with what he thought was best. He can now take pride in being his own man.

FAULTY ATTITUDES

This got me thinking; how many times do you blame your parents, your childhood, your upbringing for your problems? For your faulty attitudes towards life?

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