In Summary
  • Under the leadership of his widow, Winnie Juma, Limpopo International stayed together a few months, performing at various stages, some as big as the Ramogi Night of November 2011, before cracks emerged in the band.

It is three years since rumba maestro Musa Juma of Limpopo International band died. Wrangles among the band members, however, are threatening his legacy.

One of the former band members, Salawowo Salapata, when asked what is going on in the band, is quick to ask: “Tom, est-ce que tu peux nous reunir?” in which he was asking if this writer could facilitate the reunion of Limpopo International.

Musa Juma had a blazing desire to firmly grip the society with his music. And as Salapata puts it, “When Musa Juma sang, he really sang!”

The grand pan-African he was, Juma aimed at building a huge orchestra of African musicians by signing artistes from beyond Kenya’s borders and singing in diverse languages that would appeal to all.

From Tanzania, he brought into the band vocalist Jose Mzungu, and guitarists Makaranga and Makubania. From Congo, he brought in Mokili, Vasco da Gama, Frank Libe, Prof Azile and Salapata.

That assembly of talented guitarists, percussionists and vocalists added to his local stars of Sande Asweda, Ken Watenya, Prince Kassam, John Junior, Salim Watiechere and his own brother, Omondi Tony to make up the colossal ensemble of Limpopo International. Juma believed he had a force majeur to dominate the rumba scene for years to come.

However, the cruel hand of death took him away on March 15, 2011. The maestro would not strum his guitar anymore.

And with it a whole load of legacy seemed to have been washed away. Juma’s musical empire would also soon come tumbling down from the friction within the band.

Leadership of his widow

Under the leadership of his widow, Winnie Juma, Limpopo International stayed together a few months, performing at various stages, some as big as the Ramogi Night of November 2011, before cracks emerged in the band.

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