In Summary
  • And they’re much more careful about choosing a partner because they’ve seen so many relationships fail.
  • In particular, they want to learn as much as possible about a potential partner before they invest money, time and energy on each other.

Ask older people what they think about today’s young couples, and they’ll tell you that this generation is doing relationships all wrong.

But relationships aren’t cast in stone. Because they reflect any changes that are occurring in society.

Like until recently, people had no choice but to get married, because it took two to gather enough food for a family, or to look after the herds and crops, or to run the family business.

And in almost every society, you had to be married to be considered a full adult.

Marriage was also an important way of increasing wealth. So, parents insisted on choosing spouses for their children, who brought the right land, business connections or social status into the family.

And it wasn’t just the parents. The whole community often had a hand in deciding who wed who, which didn’t leave a lot of room for romance!

FINANCIAL STABILITY

But in urban, westernised societies, that world has gone. Now almost everywhere, men and women have equal rights, and equal access to education and a career.

The pace of change is relentless, and full employment is increasingly uncertain. So, young people want to — and can — stand on their own two feet before they marry. They want to choose their partners for themselves. And if things don’t work out, to be able to divorce easily.

So, the millennials who were born from the mid 1980s to the early 2000s are marrying very differently from their parents. They’re marrying much later because they want to be financially independent first.

And they’re much more careful about choosing a partner because they’ve seen so many relationships fail.

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