In Summary
  • In their 1998 book, Multi-Party Politics in Kenya, David Throup and Charles Hornsby argue that the most striking feature of the Cabinet was the absence of seven senior ministers and 15 assistant ministers, who were closely associated with the Kenyatta regime.
  • Twelve new ministers joined the Cabinet as new dockets for Energy, Industry, Transport and Communications, and Environment and Natural Resources were created.
  • Nyachae assumed control of the Cabinet Secretariat and had the president’s ear on matters of policy.

President Daniel arap Moi named an expanded Cabinet following the General Election.

Some 72 out of 158 MPs lost their seats in the first election in the president’s rule held on November 8.

In their 1998 book, Multi-Party Politics in Kenya, David Throup and Charles Hornsby argue that the most striking feature of the Cabinet was the absence of seven senior ministers and 15 assistant ministers, who were closely associated with the Kenyatta regime.

They were among those who lost in the elections.

The Cabinet was also larger. For instance, the Agriculture Ministry, which previously had two assistant ministers, now had two ministers and six assistant ministers.

Twelve new ministers joined the Cabinet as new dockets for Energy, Industry, Transport and Communications, and Environment and Natural Resources were created.

They were all headed by Moi’s cronies.

Henry Kosgey was in Energy while Jonathan arap Ng’eno became minister of Water Development.

“Their appointments came with the message that cooperation with the new regime would be rewarded,” Throup and Hornsby write.

The Kenyatta regime had ended a year before following his death on August 22, 1978.

Dr Robert Ouko had been brought by Kenyatta into his Cabinet in 1977 as minister for Economic Planning and Community Affairs.

After he won the Kisumu Rural seat in 1979, Moi appointed him to the Foreign Affairs docket.

President’s cronies

Throup and Hornsby argue that the candidates who were openly supported by Moi also won parliamentary seats.

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